7 Simple Ways To Reduce & Manage Anxiety — Carry your own weather

Sometime last year, I got diagnosed with “Anxiety”. I wouldn’t like to call it a disorder, as I no longer think or perceive it as such. Being anxious, is a pre-disposed personality type and that is all there is to it. Generally, those that are more planned, organized and prefer to be in control of […]

7 SIMPLE WAYS TO REDUCE AND MANAGE ANXIETY — Carry your own weather

Time to Talk Day 2021

Today, February 4th, is Time to Talk Day 2021!! This is one of the most important days of the year in the Mental Health calendar, and is an event which lies very closely to my heart. Time to Talk Day is a social movement which continues to work to change the way in which we think and act surrounding our Mental Health & Wellbeing.

Let’s take a bit of a deeper look into Time to Talk Day and my hopes for it in today’s blog!

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You Are Not Alone

2020 has proved to be a very difficult year for many, and it is completely understandable if you feel as if you are going through things by yourself. This feeling of loneliness can have a very large impact on your Mental health and Wellbeing, and can lead to an increase in anxiety and stress levels. In today’s blog, I am going to be sharing how important it is to remember that you are not alone and why it is so crucial to ask for support when you need it.

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Running a business whilst maintaining your Mental Health – Cooper Galloway

Running your own business is a dream of so many people when they are growing up, but for the ones that dive to turn that dream into a reality, how do we keep a close eye on our Mental Wellbeing while running a business? Is it something that demands we dramatically alter the way in which we live our lives, or more so a series of smaller adjustments that we can slot into our schedules? This is what we’ll be exploring in today’s blog!

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I Guest-Starred in a New Podcast

On Saturday 31st October, I was asked to be a special guest on a brand new podcast, called “26 minutes with”, which has been created by Respect Mental Health and the amazing Benjamin Seal. It was an honour to be asked to e the first guest for the show and we are going to be taking a bit of a closer look at the podcast in today’s blog!

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World Mental Health Day 2020

Mental Health is something that affects each and every one of us as people. Our Mental Health makes up who we are, who we want to be, and so much more. It is a phenomenally large field, that continues to grow each and every day. Over the last couple of years the spotlight and mainstream media have started to focus in more on the Mental Health and Wellbeing of people and international events, such as World Mental Health Day, which is happening today on the 10th October and so important for our future.

So let’s take a closer look into Mental Health and World Mental Health Day 2020!

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Isolation… Lockdown… Make mental health as important as physical health — Depression Survivor

So many of us have become great at hand washing, social distancing, and isolating. But as our isolation continues, how many of us are being as deliberate and mindful with caring for our mental health? As we navigate this truly bizarre time, anxiety, depression, fear, and helplessness are all around us. There’s so much that […]

Isolation… Lockdown… Make mental health as important as physical health — Depression Survivor

Time to Talk – Blog 1: The Introduction

Time to Talk Day 2020 was on 06/02/2020 and in celebration of such an important event, I have decided to start this new Time to Talk series! This series is going to be a real eye opening series and is going to be on that I am really looking forward to starting!

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This is the 1st blog in the new Time to Talk series that I am going to be launching. This series was inspired by Time to Talk Day which was on the 6th of February this year! This series is going to all be about people’s stories regarding Stuttering, Stress and Mental Health. The aim of this series is to share and tell the stories that help make us who we are and how we have got to where we are now.

Although the main concept for Time to Talk day is surrounding opening up about Mental Health problems, I feel like if we bring in conditions such as Stuttering and Stress then it can make for an even more enlightening experience to both read and write. I also feel like this will open up a lot of different avenues that people can discuss and share experiences in which can ultimately help more and more people.

I am planning on running and writing this series very differently from how I usually write them. I feel like for this series to have the desired effect and message that I want it to have then it would be much better to bring in guest writers who wish to share their story. If you have any ideas or stories that you want to share then please feel free to get in contact with me! I am always happy to talk through ideas, no matter how weird or bizarre they may seem at first!

All I’m looking for is a story, can be as long or short as you’d like, about a time where you’ve experienced or seen someone experience something relating to Stuttering, Stress, Mental Health or anything similar to these! If you want to stay anonymous or want to use an alias for your story too that is completely fine, it is the story itself and the message it carries that is important. Let me know if you have any ideas!

In regards to the schedule of the series, at this current moment, I am unsure of how long the series is going to be and when the new blogs in the series will be released. I suppose it comes down to how many people wish to share their story. I may or may not write a few blogs for the series too, it is something that I am not 100% on currently but is something that I am thinking of doing. I feel that the blogs that I could write for the series would be better in their own series and really want this series to be about other peoples stories.

If you have an idea for a blog or story and are nervous about writing or sharing it please get in contact with me too. We can discuss the idea through and if you want to then write it I can help with the wording and phrasing if appropriate. As stated previously every idea is encouraged, I will always talk through ideas with you, even if it seems really silly at first!

That’s all I want to talk about in today’s blog! Thank you all for reading! What do you all think? Are you excited for this new series? Do you have any ideas that you want to share? Have you ever had an idea but didn’t know how to take it forward? Leave your answers to the following questions either in the comments or on our Facebook page and we’ll have a chat about it!

Thanks for reading and I hope you have a great day!

Sweeney’s Blogs

Any money donated here is greatly appreciated! I will be putting the money back into the page through advertising, guest writers and conet creation!

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James

Alzheimer’s Avoidance – Blog 7: Early Identification

Similar to most illnesses and conditions in life, Early Identification can make the world of difference. AT the end of the day if we do not know that we have something, how are we meant to try and cure/treat it? Today’s blog is going to look at how early identification can be a great thing to do when it comes to Alzheimer’s and Alzheimer’s Avoidance.

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Today’s blog is the seventh blog in the Alzheimer’s Avoidance series and is going to be about Early Identification. Early Identification is the process of identifying if you do have Alzheimer’s/Dementia, or indeed any other medical condition, at an early stage to ensure that you can plan out your treatment plan carefully and you can take steps to try and reduce the risk of it getting worse.

To many, the concept of knowing that they have Alzheimer’s is a daunting one but is it really a bad thing? I fully understand that learning that you may have a condition such as Alzheimer’s can be absolutely horrifying news but it is still better to identify earlier rather than later. We need to try and flip the negatives we have about identifying it earlier to really see the positives.

selective focus photo of brown and blue hourglass on stones

Firstly if you do unfortunately have a condition then you will be put on the system. I know that being on the system doesn’t always help but it can make a big difference for things such as medication. If you find out that you do have Alzheimer’s then you can talk through possible medication that you can take with your doctor.

I am no medical expert but there are a lot of different types that all do different things. Some are designed to slow the speed that your mind deteriorates whereas others are designed to calm you down and relax your mind before you go into phases such as sundowning. Medication isn’t guaranteed to work or isn’t definitely going to help but isn’t it better to try and see?

As well as the medical positives, early identification can be a massive help to your family and friends. Even though it will be a massive shock for them at first, after they have processed what is happening, they will have more time to try and help you. There are things that family and friends can do to try and slow down the rate in which Alzheimer’s deteriorates and with early identification, they will have more time to try and figure out which methods work and which don’t.

people sitting on seashore while watching golden hour

In regards to what methods family and friends can use to try and reduce the rate in which Alzheimer’s deteriorates, I would advise following some of what the other blogs in this series say. Doing things such as regular exercise and puzzle games aren’t guaranteed to work but it is still better to try them in the chance that they do work.

Now briefly onto how you can identify if you have Alzheimer’s at an early stage. The one thing that I would say here is if you start noticing that you are forgetting things more than usual or your mind is going funny, go and see your doctor. The same goes with family and friends if you see someone you know start to lose their memory and forget things like their names, the date, etc, then advise them to go to the doctor. The doctor can then book them in to do a memory/Alzheimer’s test and appropriate measures can be taken from there based off of the result. If it comes back that you do not have Alzheimer’s then that is an added bonus, it is better to be safe than sorry!

That is all I want to talk about in today’s’ blog! Thank you all for reading! What do you all think? Do you think early identification is important? Do you want this series to keep going or should I end it soon? Let me know what you think to those questions and any other questions you have in the comment section below!

Thank you all for reading and I hope you have a great day,

Sweeney’s Blogs

Any money donated here will be put back into the business. This can be through marketing campaigns, upgrades to plans or for setting up future events!

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James

Alzheimer’s Avoidance – Blog 6: Short Term Memory

Short Term Memory is one of the first things that gets affected by Alzheimer’s. As Alzheimer’s disease progresses, short term memory is one of the more visible signs that there is something wrong. It begins with you not being able to remember what happened yesterday, then last week, then last month and so on. It is a very important topic to look at and it is what we are going to be covering in today’s blog.

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Today’s blog is the sixth blog in the Alzheimer’s Avoidance series and is going to be about Short Term Memory. As I said in the introduction to this blog Short Term Memory is one of the more visible signs that someone has Alzheimer’s or that their condition is deteriorating. It is something that we have to pay close attention to and something that we need to try and identify sooner rather than later.

This short video introduces the topic from a professional’s point of view:

Larry Lawhorne tells us in the video that the first thing that people forget is what someone has just told them. Short Term Memory is affected first and foremost in nearly all Alzheimer’s patients. People start to forget their partner’s name, who they are, where they are and so on.

This progresses into affecting language skills, such as forgetting certain words. The example used in the video was surrounding a pen. A person with Alzheimer’s could forget what a pen is and have to explain what it is to you for you to tell them the word. As we saw in the video Larry describes the pen as something you hold in your hand to write with. Now I fully understand that if you do not know someone with Alzheimer’s then this might not sound real, but it really is.

The second video we have reinforces the points made in the first video but also brings in testing and a deeper insight into what is actually happening:

When planning this blog out I thought of two different angles that I could take. The first one was to go into great detail about what happens to short term memory when it is affected by Alzheimer’s. This was the one I was going to go with when I realised something. This series was designed to talk about how we can reduce our chances of getting Alzheimer’s, not just about how memory is affected by the cruel disease. That is why I have instead chosen to go with the second plan.

The second plan was to talk briefly about how Alzheimer’s affects short term memory and then talk about how we can use this to our advantage in trying to reduce our risk of getting Alzheimer’s. This is the plan that I am using for this blog. We have already gone over how it affects short term memory and the video goes into a little more detail by talking about how it affects the Hippocampus part of the brain.

So the question arises now, how do we try to maintain our short term memory?

There are a few different ways that we can try to maintain our short term memory. Firstly is by simply asking questions about what happened recently. What you could try to do is recap what has happened over the past day, then the past week then the past month. This will help ensure that you are keeping your brain stimulated and are constantly thinking and recapping what is going on.

The second way is by keeping in touch with the recent news. News is a great way of keeping in the loop of not only what is going on in the world but what is going on in your local area and what is happening with your friends and family. These ways are just about remembering what has happened but there are a lot more ways to improve short term memory.

One of the ways is through mental stimulation games and memory tests. You only have to search memory test on youtube and you can see millions of different results. There are youtube videos, websites and apps that are all designed with the intent to help yu improve your memory. Use the resources that are available. They are there for a reason so make the most of them.

There are a lot of extra methods that I have not spoken about but if you do want to learn more you can always search online or message me and I’ll look into it and get back to you!

That’s all I wanted to talk about in today’s blog! Thank you all for reading! What do you think? Do you think short term memory is something we can improve? How would you improve your short term memory? Do you know any other techniques to reduce your chances of getting Alzheimer’s? Let me know what you think in the comments or on our Facebook page!

Sweeney’s Blogs

Any money donated here will be put back into the business. This can be through marketing campaigns, upgrades to plans or for setting up future events!

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James

Alzheimer’s Avoidance – Blog 5: Listening to Music?

Music – one of the biggest art forms in the world is, on average, listened to by people for around 5 hours per day. people who listen to music do so for a whole number of different reasons. Some people listen to music to help them relax, some to help them focus and some to just simply pass the time. People use and listen to music near;y every day but has anyone stopped to think about how listening to music can affect your chances of getting Alzheimer’s?

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Today’s blog is going to be the fifth blog in the Alzheimer’s Avoidance series and is going to be about how listening to music can help reduce your chance of getting Alzheimer’s/ Dementia. Listening to music can help trigger emotional memories and is a real help to people with Alzheimer’s but also to people who do not have the condition.

I could go into detail describing the ways that music helps people with Alzheimer’s but I have found a few videos that do a much better job. the two videos in this blog are both fairly short but add so much more value in comparison to the words that I could use.

This first video always makes me smile. The sheer difference that music makes to Carol’s confidence and memory is astounding and the emotion that you can feel from her and her husband is a great feeling. Watching how a person can go from barely speaking to singing along to a song due to the power of music is a pleasure to watch and goes to show the effect that music can have on a person with Alzheimer’s.

The reaction and recognition that the music brings is really interesting to look at and to think about. Although the video is aimed at people who do have Alzheimer’s it does also apply to people who do not have the condition. triggering old memories can be a really good thing to do and is something that I highly encourage if you are dealing with someone who is or isn’t at risk of getting Alzheimer’s!

The second video that we are going to watch goes into a bit more depth and covers more of the educational side of music and Alzheimer’s.

I found that this video was a very interesting watch and there was one part that I found was worded excellently. This part is when one of the children is speaking near the end. he says that memories make us who we are and without them, we start to lose meaning. he says that it is really nice to have the chance to bring that meaning back to the lives of the old people who they are helping.

I could go into more detail on the topic but I feel like the videos really do it justice. they show not only the logic behind music and Alzheimer’s but also show the emotional reaction that the music generates. It really is an interesting theory to look into and there are a lot more videos and posts available if it interests you.

The happiness and smiles that you can see in the elderly people when they start listening to music is a pleasure to see and helps us see that there is still something there. There is still a part of the person left and that is something worth holding on to! Watching videos on music and Alzheimer’s helps me see that even though Alzheimer’s is a terrible condition that destroys lives, we can still be happy and enjoy music through it.

That is all I want to talk about in today’s blog! What do you all think? Did you know that there is a connection between Music and Alzheimers? Do you know any other techniques used to reduce the risk of getting Alzheimer’s? What sings would you have ion your playlist?

Thank you all for reading and I hope you enjoyed the blog. See you in the next one!

Sweeney’s Blogs

Any money donated here will be put back into the business. This can be through marketing campaigns, upgrades to plans or for setting up future events!

£5.00

James

Alzheimer’s Avoidance – Blog 4: A Good Social Life

A good social life can have lots of different benefits but have you ever thought of what it can do for your mind? Quite a lot of people talk about how a good social group can help you with motivation and support but have you ever thought that it can help reduce your chances of getting Alzheimer’s? That’s what we are going to be talking about in today’s blog.

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Today’s blog is the fourth blog in the Alzheimer’s Avoidance series and is going to be about how a good social life can help reduce your risk of getting Alzheimer’s. One of the biggest variables when it comes to Alzheimer’s and Dementia is how much you are stimulating your mind. The first three blogs in this series have all discussed topics in relation to stimulating your mind even if they haven’t been specifically labelled as doing so.

Stimulating your mind does keep it active and that is the most important thing to do to help lower your chance of getting Alzheimer’s. An example of how the other blogs link to mental stimulation can be as simple as follows. Take last weeks blog all about puzzle games. Puzzle games are designed to test your mind and make you think of creative solutions to problems. This problem-solving skill that you have to put into practice will no doubt keep your mind active, hence stimulating your brain.

So now back to how a good social life can help stimulate your mind and reduce your chance of getting Alzheimer’s. Getting out of the house for a day or two can work wonders for your mind in a number of different ways. Firstly, the fresh air itself will do your body the world of good.

Secondly and the most important part is communicating with people. Communicating with people, as you can imagine, requires you to think about what you say and have opinions based on the topic of conversation. The process of thinking about what you are going to say or talk about next does keep your mind constantly active. It allows you to relax and speak to people while ensuring you that your mind is still working as it should.

As stated in the previous blogs in this series, I am not saying that you have to go out every day to experience the benefits of a good social life. Even if you only go out once a week then you are still getting that little bit extra time of mental stimulation compared to other people. Going out once a week is still much better for you than not going out at all.

Where you will see the most difference is if you do not go out at all and don’t communicate with people. Being stuck in the same four walls, day after day, does not help you out at all. It severely affects both your Physical and Mental Health and is simply not that good for you. If you can’t go out for one week for a specific reason that is completely fine, if you purposely isolate yourself from the world, for whatever reason, it won’t help you in the long run.

In regards to what you can do with your social life, it is completely up to you! If you like playing bingo then try and go to the bingo once a week, if you like something else then try that! The actual activity that you do doesn’t really matter, it’s getting out of the house and doing something which is important!

That’s all I want to talk about in today’s blog! What do you all think? Do you think a good social life lowers your chance of getting Alzheimer’s? Can you think fo anything else that can help lower your chance of getting Alzheimer’s? DO you have a good social life? Are you going to try and have a better one? Let me know what you think of the above questions and any other questions you have in the comments below or on our Facebook page!

Thank you for reading! I hope you enjoyed the blog and have a great day! See you in the next one!

We ALL Have Mental Health: Let’s Talk About It — Peace from Panic

It’s Mental Illness Awareness Week and tomorrow, October 10, is World Mental Health Day. So let’s talk about it! Yesterday I had a wonderful opportunity to speak to a group of elementary, middle school, and high school counselors about mental illness. I’m a presenter for Ending the Silence, a mental health awareness program by the […]

via We ALL Have Mental Health: Let’s Talk About It — Peace from Panic

World Mental Health Day — Seema Kataria Blog

This has been my all-time valued question. How are you? Sometimes, we have to ask this more frequently, even when we hear “I am fine.” Seriously, there is so much more to ‘I am fine.’ ‘I am good.’ ‘Leave me alone.’ Sometime back, I happen to write a one-liner observing how this person has been […]

via World Mental Health Day — Seema Kataria Blog